May 282017
 

I blogged about SyncThing before, when BitTorrentSync started to annoy the hell out of me. SyncThing is an open source tool for synchronizing directory trees between different devices without requiring a cloud service (it needs a discovery server though in order to actually find these devices).

There is also an Android app for it as well as a tool called Anyplace Sync Browser that does not sync but allows you to selectively download files from SyncThing directories to your phone.

Unfortunately SyncThing is far from easy to install and configure. It seems easy when you read the documentation (OK, not easy, really, it’s too technical for the average user and is missing a lot of information for professionals) but if anything goes wrong, you are on your own. And something goes wrong every so often, especially when there is an update.

By default, it is a console program that runs in the background (daemon) and on Windows can be made into a service by using e.g. NSSM – the Non-Sucking Service Manager. Configuration is then done via a web interface provided by that program. But there are also native GUI front ends.

The Android app also comes with a UI, but that GUI is atrocious. I have rarely seen a tool with so confusing a UI.

On the bright side, there are programs for Windows, any flavor of Unix you can think of and the aforementioned Android App. When it works, it is great.

I use it for:

  • Sync photos from my phone one way to my desktop PC
  • Sync text files with notes and checklists both ways between my pone and my desktop PC

So, even though I think it is overly complicated, I still like the idea and am using it.

May 282017
 


Denkzettel is a simple Android app by Silvio Schurig for writing notes as text files and organizing them into categories (= subdirectories) on an Android smart phone. It can also use these files as check lists.

In contrast to most other apps of this type it does not integrate into an online service. The data is strictly kept on the phone. In combination with any sync tool (e.g. syncthing) you can still keep your data in sync with e.g. your desktop pc.

I love it.

May 252017
 

Just so I can look it up later, if I need it:

The following are some interesting addons for Firefox:

  • FireGestures is a Firefox extension which enables you to execute various commands with six types of gestures.
  • Speed Start Speed Dial & Start Page with flexible layout for fast access to sites via visual bookmarks
  • uBlock an open source ad blocker. You can’t use the web without one nowadays (Anybody still remember Webwasher?)

I particularly like Speed Start. It allows me to configure the start page just the way I want it.

May 222017
 

Jeroen Wiert Pluimers has notified me in his comment on Google+ that the RSS feed for GExperts related posts doesn’t work. I apparently forgot a forward slash in the url:

correct:

http://blog.dummzeuch.de/category/gexperts/feed/

wrong:
http://blog.dummzeuch.de/category/gexpertsfeed/

It’s fixed now, sorry about that.

May 222017
 

I have been asked to provide GExperts for Delphi 10.2 Tokyo, multiple times, via various channels.

Apparently not everybody subscribed to the GExperts Community on Google+, where I posted this on 2017-04-01:

No April fools’ joke: GExperts 1.38 experimental 2017-04-01 for Delphi 10.2.

This version should solve several bugs that resulted in Access Violations in the IDE or made the IDE hang.

Again: This is not for the faint of heart. It is barely tested. Download only if you promise not to blame me for the work you lost.

Please report any bugs on sourceforge https://sourceforge.net/p/gexperts/bugs/

http://download.dummzeuch.de/GExperts/1.38_2017-04-01/GXRS10.2-138-experimental-twm-2017-04-01.exe

There seem to be multiple download links on the web for GExperts for Delphi 10.2 Tokyo that want to charge for a “VIP membership”. These have not been authorized by me at all.

To those who already downloaded it back then: This is still the same version. I have started working on a major change in the way dialog changes and bugfixes are handled internally, which currently is a mess. That change is far from finished, so it doesn’t make much sense to build a new installer right now.

May 142017
 

I ported my dzFeedReader tool which was originally written in Delphi 2009 to Lazarus. It’s still a Windows only program though.

This is more a proof of concept than a useful program, but it works. I also switched it from the SimpleRSS library to my own units so it is now under the MPL like all my other projects rather than the GPL.

May 132017
 

Some notes on Lazarus:

The Lazarus Wiki says on the topic of Internet Tools, that the following should load a web page:

uses simpleinternet;
..
str := retrieve('http://www.google.de');

Unfortunately it fails to mention (or if it is mentioned, I overlooked it), that you first need to download and install the Internet Tools.

After downloading them and adding three directories to the search path, it still failed to compile because it tried to use FLRE which is not part of the standard installation. To use the standard regular expression engine that comes with Lazarus, you need to add the conditional define USE_SOROKINS_REGEX.

Conditional defines for a project are set in Project Options -> Compiler Options -> Custom Options. Press the Defines button, enter the conditional define and press the Add button.

That finally got my simple test program to compile.

May 102017
 

So I don’t forget:

Adding a comment to an existing IXMLNode is simple, once you find out how:

var
  CommentNode: IXMLNode;
begin
  CommentNode := ParentNode.OwnerDocument.CreateNode('comment text', ntComment);
  ParentNode.ChildNodes.Add(CommentNode);

This is documented in the DocWiki

May 072017
 

Many months ago I used Yahoo Pipes to create a RSS feed aggregator of Delphi related blogs which I called The Delphi Pipe. Unfortunately shortly after that Yahoo shut down their Pipes service so The Delphi Pipe was rather short lived.

Today I revived it using a different technique. You can find all about it on The Delphi Pipe page.

Apr 232017
 

Two weeks ago I added the Donations for GExperts page. A few days later I received the first money through PayPal. Thanks for that!

I have now used that credit for donations to other open source software that I use daily:

I had always wanted to donate to those projects but never came around actually doing that. So, having some ready to use credits on PayPal made me finally do it.

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